RCN-CCUS Annual Meeting and Workshop April 14-16

CCUSconference

Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Hall, Columbia University, Room 412

Monday, April 14th Air Capture and its Applications in Closing the Carbon Cycle
Tuesday, April 15th RCN-CCUS Annual Meeting Panel 1 & Panel 2
Wednesday, April 16th RCN-CCUS Annual Meeting Panel 3

Click the “+” next to the name to read participant biographies and/or abstracts. Click the hyperlinked titles for PDF presentations. Click the “(video link)” to see footage from individual panels

Air Capture and its Applications in Closing the Carbon Cycle
Monday, April 14th 2014

Annual Conference between the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at Columbia University and the Department of Energy Conversion and Storage at the Denmark Technical University (DTU)

Introduction (video link)
+ Mogens Mogensen, Technical University of Denmark
Closing the Carbon Cycle with Air Capture

momo@dtu.dk

mmMogens Bjerg Mogensn is Research Professor at Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark (DTU). He holds a PhD in Stress Corrosion Cracking of Mild Steel from the Institute of Metallurgy, DTU, 1976. His research and publication activities are mainly in energy research, with over 40 years of electrochemistry and chemistry for energy conversion, reversible electrolyser cells / fuel cells since 1988. His early work was in the areas of batteries, nuclear energy and corrosion. He has been the project manager of several large and numerous smaller scientific projects in close cooperation with industry. Publication activity: from Web of Science: > 225 papers cited > 7250 times, average citations 32; h-index 45. In total > 350 scientific publications in journals, books, proceedings, reports, hereof 20 patents/applications, 20 special reports, 16 popular articles; editor or co-editor of 9 books.

PANEL 1: Business & Policy Implications (video link)

Moderator:
+ Jason Bordoff, Columbia University

jbJason Bordoff joined the Columbia faculty after serving until January 2013 as Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Energy and Climate Change on the Staff of the National Security Council, and, prior to that, holding senior policy positions on the White House’s National Economic Council and Council on Environmental Quality. One of the nation’s top energy policy experts, he joined the Administration in April 2009. At Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), Bordoff is a professor of professional practice and serves as Director of SIPA’s Center on Global Energy Policy. Bordoff’s research and policy interests lie at the intersection of economics, energy, environment, and national security. Prior to joining the White House, Bordoff was the Policy Director of the Hamilton Project, an economic policy initiative housed at the Brookings Institution. He is also a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a consultant to the National Intelligence Council, and serves on the board of the Association of Marshall Scholars. During the Clinton Administration, Bordoff served as an advisor to the Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Treasury Department. He was also a consultant with McKinsey & Company, one of the leading global strategy consultancies. Bordoff graduated with honors from Harvard Law School, where he was treasurer and an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and clerked on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He also holds an MLitt degree from Oxford University, where he studied as a Marshall Scholar, and a BA magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Brown University.

Speakers:
+ Scott Barrett, Columbia University
Some thoughts on climate policy and air capture

sbScott Barrett is the Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University. His research focuses on how institutions like norms, customary law, resolutions, and treaties can be used to promote international cooperation on issues like climate change and disease eradication. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles as well as two books, Environment and Statecraft and Why Cooperate?, both published by Oxford University Press. In addition to his academic work, he has advises a number of international organizations on these issues and was previously a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Barrett previously taught at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC and at the London Business School. He has also been a visiting scholar at Yale and Princeton. Barrett is a research fellow with the Beijer Institute (Stockholm), CESifo (Munich), and the Kiel Institute of World Economics. He received his PhD in Economics from the London School of Economics.

Some thoughts on climate policy and air capture

Avoiding “dangerous” climate change has been interpreted to mean limiting atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases so as to prevent global mean temperature change from exceeding a critical level. This can be done by reducing emissions dramatically or by coupling some reduction in emissions with direct CO2 removal from the atmosphere. Air capture becomes more attractive as the difficulty of limiting emissions increases and as the target concentration level decreases. Air capture has other advantages. It is the only true “backstop technology” for limiting concentrations. Like “geoengineering” (“solar radiation management”) it can be deployed by a small number of countries; but unlike “geoengineering,” it addresses the root cause of climate change. One key problem with air capture is its cost, which is currently expected to be huge but which is also very uncertain. Given air capture’s unique characteristics, public funding for R&D into its costs, efficacy, and safety (particularly large scale CO2 storage) should be a priority.

+ Steven Smith, Stamford Center for Innovation
Clean tech and business startups

smSteve has over 30 years of experience as a senior executive founding, operating, advising and investing in diverse businesses in technology, media, energy, life sciences and financial services. Steve is particularly interested in building private equity and venture capital vehicles appropriate for Responsible Investing mandates. He has a long track record for connecting the dots and identifying previously unseen connections, and is a recognized thought leader and key driver of growth and innovation.
Steve provides consulting and advisory services working closely with corporate venture/equity groups at GE, ABB, Siemens and Nike and with funds such as Pegasus Capital, the Fund for the Global Good, Missionpoint Capital and Ritchie Capital, while helping with early growth stage companies develop strategies and raise capital.
Prior to his current advisory focus, Steve was an Operating Advisor at Pegasus Capital and was primarily focused on building a distributed power solutions platform via his role with Zerobase Technologies. In addition to creating a rollup plan in distributed power solutions, Steve was active in sourcing deals in clean energy, water, agriculture, energy efficiency, recycling, green finance and security and raising capital for select Pegasus initiatives.
Previously, Steve was Senior Managing Director at Ritchie Capital Management from 2004-2008. In his role at Ritchie he was responsible for the global venture and private equity business across several sectors including media/technology, energy and biotech.
Prior to Ritchie Capital, Steve served in several senior executive roles at GE Capital over the course of thirteen years. Most recently Steve was Senior Managing Director at GE Equity with responsibility for Technology and Communications and overall GE Equity strategy. Steve’s team invested over $700mm in 100+ companies and 20 funds and generated $1.5b in capital gains.
Prior to GE, Steve was a senior associate with Booz Allen from 1984-1990 and a member of the Financial Industries practice in New York, Dallas, San Francisco, Singapore and Sydney. Steve led strategy assignments in a diverse set of industries including financial services, energy, media and technology. Steve is a graduate of Southern Methodist University and the Wharton School of Business.

+ Christopher A. Cavanagh, National Grid
Role of Renewable Natural Gas in Closing Carbon Cycle

015a 9x9x300Christopher Cavanagh is a Principal Project Manager in the Customer & Business Strategy team at National Grid and is responsible for implementing a process for the development of new electric and gas technologies for customers to support the National Grid’s goals. Mr. Cavanagh has twenty five years experience in product development at National Grid and its predecessor companies. Mr. Cavanagh previously managed research programs in the areas of alternative fuel vehicles, advanced heating & cooling and distributed generation, including fuel cells. Mr. Cavanagh was a senior engineer with the New York architect-engineering firm, Gibbs & Hill. Mr. Cavanagh is a licensed professional engineer and a Member of the American Society of Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning Engineers. Mr. Cavanagh holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree from the Cooper Union, an MS from Polytechnic University and an MBA from Dowling College. Mr. Cavanagh resides in Hazlet, NJ where he recently served as Chairman of Open Space Advisory Council and the Planning Board and an Environmental Commissioner. Mr. Cavanagh is also the head state judge and Assistant Problem Captain for the structure problem in the annual international Odyssey if the Mind competition for school age children and has judged the NYC FIRST Robotics Competition.
Role of Renewable Natural Gas in Closing the Carbon Cycle
Abstract: Renewable natural gas has the potential to be a viable renewable energy resource and make a significant contribution to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The presentation represents a national view on the potential, along with a discussion on technology and current challenges in this space. Presentation will also include National Grid’s partnership with New York City in building a proof of concept demonstration project at the Newtown Creek wastewater treatment plant.

PANEL 2 Synthetic fuels (video link)
Moderator:
+ Vikram Rao, Research Triangle Executive Consortium

Vikram RaoVikram Rao is the executive director of the Research Triangle Executive Consortium, and assumed this position on September 1, 2008. Rao spent 9 years with Halliburton and another 25 with predecessor companies. Most recently he served as senior vice president and chief technology officer, responsible for Halliburton’s technology effort as well as intellectual asset management. He joined a predecessor company in 1974 as a senior research engineer.
Dr. Rao serves on the board of Intelligent Well Controls Ltd. and also advises venture capitalist Energy Ventures AS, and firms BioLargo Inc., Global Energy Talent Ltd. and Integro Earth Fuels Inc. He also serves as a member of the North Carolina Mining and Energy Commission.
Rao is the author of more than 50 publications and has been awarded 30 United States patents and foreign analogs in fields that include non-ferrous metal refining, alloy formulations, and oil and gas technology. RTI Press released his book Shale Gas: the Promise and the Peril in July 2012. Rao earned a doctorate degree and a master’s in engineering from Stanford University, and holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, in Chennai India.

Speakers:
+ Christian Von Olshausen, Sunfire
Power-to-fuel scaling vs. market requirements

cvChristian von Olshausen is co-founder and responsible for technical management at Sunfire. Prior to this, he worked as Head of Pharmaceutical Production for several years at Procter & Gamble. His previous employers included CLAAS (strategic production planning) and Daimler (development of fuel-cell propulsion systems). Mr von Olshausen is a Graduate Industrial Engineer and studied in Karlsruhe, Turin, and Dresden.
Sunfire develops high-temperature fuel cells (SOFC) which convert gas into electricity and heat used for several markets such as Micro CHP, off-grid, marine, IT servers, etc. sunfire also develops high-temperature electrolysers (SOEC) which produce hydrogen used in Power-to-Gas/Liquids installations, industrial sites and H2 mobility. The unique selling propositions are the high efficiency, robustness and good cost curve potential of the fuel cell and electrolyser as well as the efficient combination of the high-temperature electrolyser with Power-to-Liquids/Gas processes.

Power-to-fuel scaling vs. market requirements
In the course of the German Energiewende, the concept of Power-to-Fuel is mainly driven by two factors:
1. Storage of energy for securing energy supply
2. Contribution to grid stability by buffering fluctuating renewable energy
There are arguments for both, large and small plants. The availability of renewable energy and the contribution to grid stability in mid- and low-voltage grids (lateral energy network) require rather small plants (30 – 500 kW) whilst economies of production scale for affordable energy storage, especially via liquid fuels, require MW-scale based upon current technology concepts.
Sunfire is about to start up its first Power-to-Liquid pilot plant whose design aims for the MW-scale. Currently sunfire is also investigating small scale PtG/PtL-designs.
In the presentation sunfire shall share results from market research and cost estimation. Also results from the current technology development, especially on steam-electrolyser-development, will be shown.

+ Søren Lyng Ebbehøj, Technical University of Denmark
Feeding CO2 from air into solid oxide electrolyzer cells

SLEBB PortraitSøren Lyng Ebbehøj is a master of science in sustainable energy, specialized in hydrogen and fuel cells from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU). He graduated in 2011 and is currently pursuing his PhD studies at the Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, DTU. The subject is integration of technologies for capture and electrochemical conversion of CO2 from the atmosphere for production of synthetic fuels. In the spring 2013, Søren visited the Lenfest Centre for Sustainable Energy, Columbia University for a research stay, focusing on desorption kinetics and the purity of the product stream from the CO2 air capture technology being investigated there. Currently, Søren is working on modelling the full system from capture of CO2 to the finished hydrocarbon product such as methane, methanol or dimethyl ether.

Feeding CO2 from air into solid oxide electrolyzer cells
Synthetic, green hydrocarbon fuels can be produced from CO2, captured from the atmosphere, via solid oxide co-electrolysis and commercial fuel synthesis technologies. This seems to be a promising technological approach to storing energy from intermittent, sustainable electricity sources and/or production of carbon neutral hydrocarbon fuels for aviation and other energy intense transportation applications.
An analysis has been conducted, quantifying trace impurities in the resulting gas streams from CO2 air capture devices down to the level of 10-50 ppb. This was done by adsorption on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia filters, usually used for gas cleaning (patent pending) followed by elemental analysis by Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS). Various trace impurities known to have detrimental effects Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell (SOEC) operation were detected in low concentrations, and strategies for cheap and efficient cleaning of gasses for use in SOECs have been tested.
Further, a system integration study is being conducted, simulating the process from capture of CO2 from the atmosphere to the production of syngas fit for subsequent production of synthetic natural gas (methane). This work includes the analysis of various strategies for pressurization of the reactant gasses (CO2 and H2O) for the SOEC, operated at 850 °C and high pressure (10-100 atm). Pinch point analyses have been carried out for integration and recuperation of process heat in order to form the basis of a subsequent economic analysis of the process.

+ John Bøgild Hansen, Haldor Topsøe
Methanol Synthesis from CO2

jbhJohn Bøgild Hansen has been with Haldor Topsøe since 1975 in several capacities. In 2013 he was appointed Senior Advisor to Company Management. From 2000-2013, he was Senior Scientist, Company Management and Advisor to the Chairman, Dr. Haldor Topsøe on Hydrogen, Alternative Fuels, Energy conversion, Fuel and Electrolyser Cells. From 1985-1997, he was Department Manager in the general catalysis group and responsible for advancing methanol and DME technologies. Before, he was a Research Engineer in the catalysis group.
John Bøgild Hansen has around 50 publications including 6 book chapters and holds 22 patents. He has been invited as key note speaker for more than 20 lectures on synthetic fuel production, fuel cells, solid oxide electrolysis and fuels from biomass production and has given more than 30 presentations at international conferences. He holds an MS in Chemical Engineering from Technical University of Denmark

Methanol Synthesis from CO2

Methanol is a major commodity chemical. Today it is mainly produced starting from natural gas or coal. Synthesis of methanol is deceptively simple, but in fact highly complex, because the equlibria, kinetics, selectivity and indeed the morphology of the synthesis catalyst itself changes as the synthesis gas composition changes. A consensus about the reaction mechanism has emerged: Methanol is formed by hydrogenation of carbon dioxide, although the subject is still debated. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell stacks (SOEC) are able to produce inert free synthesis gas of any desired composition from electric power, carbon dioxide and steam, but the necessary stack area, power and required balance of plant components will vary as function of conversion and gas composition. It is also important to avoid carbon formation. The overall optimum plant configuration starting from just CO2, steam and electricity is thus a trade off between many different optimization criteria including degradation phenomena and will discussed in detail in the paper. The paper will also consider and give examples of the possible synergies between SOEC plants and generation of synthesis gas by biomass gasification.

PANEL 3 Air Capture Technologies (video link)
Moderator:
+ Peter Eisenberger, Columbia University

(video link)

pePeter Eisenberger has studied and worked in the applied sciences field for more than four decades. He started his career at Bell Laboratories in 1968 where from 1974-1981 he was a department head and his research interests involved using X-ray produced by Synchrotron radiation to study the structural properties of complex solids and surfaces. In 1981, Eisenberger joined Exxon Research and Engineering Company as Director of their Physical Sciences laboratory, where he remained until 1989. In 1989, Dr. Eisenberger was appointed Professor of Physics and Director of the Princeton Materials Institute at Princeton University that he founded. From 1996-1999, he was appointed Vice Provost of the Earth Institute and Director of Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University and today is a Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia, currently on sabbatical leave. Eisenberger also was a director at Cross Border Exchange from 2000-2003. Eisenberger Co-Founded Global Thermostat (GT), LLC in 2006 and serves as its Chief Technology Officer. GT offers low-cost solutions to capture CO2 promoting sustainable and harmonious use of the earth’s resources. It utilizes low-cost process heat left over in a range of industrial activities to capture carbon from air. Eisenberger holds a BA in Physics from Princeton University (1963), and a PhD from Harvard University (1967) in Applied Physics.

Speakers:
+ Alain Goeppert, University of Southern California
Regenerable polyamine based solid sorbents for CO2 capture from the air

Alain Goeppert, University of Southern California

agAlain Goeppert was born in 1974 in Strasbourg, France. After obtaining his diploma in chemistry from the University Robert Schuman in Strasbourg, he received his engineering degree from the Fachhochschule Aalen, Germany. He then returned to Strasbourg to study the reactivity of alkanes in strong acid systems under the direction of Prof Jean Sommer at the Université Louis Pasteur, earning his PhD in 2002. He then joined the groups of Professors George A. Olah and G. K. Surya Prakash at the Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute where he is currently a Senior Research Scientist. Dr. Goeppert’s research is focused on the transformation of methane and CO2 into more valuable products and CO2 capture technologies.

Regenerable polyamine based solid sorbents for CO2 capture from the air

Adsorbents prepared easily by impregnation of fumed silica with polyethylenimine (PEI) are promising candidates for the capture of CO2 directly from the air. These inexpensive adsorbents have high CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient temperature and can be regenerated in repeated cycles under mild conditions. Despite the very low CO2 concentration, they are able to scrub efficiently all the CO2 out of the air in the initial hours of the experiments. The influence of parameters such as PEI loading, adsorption and desorption temperature, relative humidity, particle size and PEI molecular weight on the adsorption behavior were investigated. The mild regeneration temperatures required could allow the use of waste heat available in many industrial processes as well as solar heat. CO2 adsorption from the air has a number of applications. Removal of CO2 from closed environment such as submarine and space vehicles is essential for life support. Supplying of CO2 free air is also critical for alkaline fuel cells and batteries. Direct air capture of CO2 could also help mitigate the rising concerns about atmospheric CO2 concentration and associated climatic changes while at the same time provide the first step for an anthropogenic carbon cycle.

+ Klaus Lackner, Columbia University
Progress on the Humidity Swing

kl2010@columbia.edu

klKlaus Lackner is the Ewing Worzel Professor of Geophysics and the Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Lackner’s current research interests include carbon capture and sequestration, air capture, energy systems and scaling properties (including synthetic fuels and wind energy), energy and environmental policy, lifecycle analysis, and zero emission modeling for coal and cement plants. Lackner earned his Ph.D. in theoretical particle physics, summa cum laude, in 1978 from Heidelberg University, was awarded the Clemm-Haas Prize for outstanding Ph.D. thesis, and was named a Fleischmann Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. He was instrumental in forming the Zero Emission Coal Alliance and was a lead author in the IPCC Report on Carbon Capture and Storage. In 1991, he received the Weapons Recognition of Excellence Award. Prof. Lackner joined the faculty at Columbia University in 2001.

+ Jon Gibbins, University of Edinburgh
Negative Emissions Technologies in UK Mitigation Strategies

jgProf. Jon Gibbins, is the director of the United Kingdom Carbon Capture and Storage Research Center. He is also a member of Pilot Scale Advanced Carbon Technology (PACT) executive board on behalf of the University of Edinburgh and manages ACTTROM – PACT Satellite facilities at the University of Edinburgh. He was previously the Principal Investigator of the UK Carbon Capture and Storage Community Network (www.ukccsc.co.uk), supported by RCUK to help link academic CCS research activities in the UK. Jon has also been the Principal Investigator for the UK Carbon and Capture Storage Consortium, the UK lead for CO2 capture in the UK/China NZEC (Near Zero Emissions from Coal) project, and a member of IEA GHG project teams looking at post-combustion capture, oxyfuel, capture plant learning curves and capture ready plants. He is an invited Government expert on CCS, has provided expert review of the IPCC Special Report on CO2 Capture, and has been an invited speaker in many international meetings and symposia on CCS.

Negative Emissions Technologies in UK Mitigation Strategies

UK researcher’s interests are in negative emissions, including air capture but also biomass energy with CCS (BECCS) and other technologies such as bicarbonate formation in oceans. Most UK energy system models (e.g. Markal, Energy Technology Institute ESME, Committe on Climate Change) indicate that the UK ‘needs’ negative emissions by around 2040. But the technologies that are assumed in these energy systems models are clearly not mature yet. Hence it is good to do fundamental R&D into them; especially because there is no “winning” technology apparent at present. There is also a lot of cross learning with “conventional” CCS, eg work on solid sorbents and the gypsum/ammonia process which was developed for air capture and found to be potentially very good for CCS. In general, mitigation via CCS and via negative emissions/air capture is seen on a spectrum of actions to achieve very low or even net zero or negative CO2 emissions.

PANEL 4 Closing the Loop through Photosynthesis and Plants (video link)
Moderator:
+ Frank O’Keefe, Infinitree LLC

frankokeefeFrank O’Keefe is founder of Infinitree LLC, utilizing Columbia Professor Klaus Lackner’s carbon capture technology to enrich greenhouse environments to increase yield by 15-30 times while decreasing need for water, fertilizer and eliminating use of pesticides. In 1999 he founded a risk management company that grew to more than $8 billion in assets administered. Prior experience include roles at Zurich Capital Markets, J.P. Morgan, and Bankers Trust after earning a MPPM degree from the Yale School of Management. O’Keefe is author of the Good Reads selection “Skating to Vietnam”, a novella, is happily married and the delighted father of three wonderful young children.

Speakers:
+ Robert Martienssen, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
Duckweed (Lemnaceae): Biological design for alkane and biodiesel production

rmRobert Martienssen is a plant geneticist, working on transposons, genome biology, and developmental genetics of maize and the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Dr. Martienssen received his B.A. in Natural Sciences (Genetics) from Cambridge University, England, in 1982, his PhD. from the Plant Breeding Institute and Cambridge University in 1986, and held an EMBO postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California at Berkeley from 1986-1988. He has been on the faculty at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory since 1989. His work at Cold Spring Harbor, leading the plant biology group, has led to the formation of a gene function database for Arabidopsis and another for maize. In addition to his full-time academic position, Dr. Martienssen is a co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of Orion Genomics, an agricultural genomics company based in St Louis MO.

Biological Design of Lemnaceae aquatic plants for alkane and biodiesel production
Lemnaceae, or duckweeds, hold great potential as a commercial biofuels crop, exhibiting a remarkable rate of biomass accumulation, carbon fixation, and compatibility with wastewater aquaculture. Our goal is to divert a substantial portion of accumulated carbon from starch to oil metabolism in Lemnaceae, establishing it a candidate biodiesel source in the nascent energy crop economy. Lemnaceae species (including Lemna gibba, Lemna perpusilla and Sipirodela polyrhyza) are the worlds’ smallest aquatic flowering plants, and although they are true monocotyledonous angiosperms, they have a much reduced morphology comprising growing fronds, resting fronds, simple roots and two “pockets” of meristematic stem cells. Lemnaceae in optimal conditions have an exponential growth rate that can double the number of fronds in 30 hours and produce 64 grams of biomass per gram starting weight in a week, which is far beyond the fastest growing corn rates (2.3 g/g /week), and unencumbered by secondary products such as lignin. Lemnaceae offer an attractive alternative to algae as biofuel feedstocks, because of their robust growth in marginal aquatic environments and excellent metabolic characteristics. Existing strains of Lemna are already in commercial use, but have been optimized for enivironmental sensing and wastewater remediation: we propose to redesign these strains for biofuel production. Our goal is to divert a substantial portion of accumulated carbon from starch to oil or alkane metabolism in Lemna, using resting fronds and primitive roots as the storage tissue. Clonal propagation, limited seed set, and variable chromosome number are shared with sugarcane and Miscanthus gigantea, and many of the technologies we develop will have applications in other energy crops. We hope to reproduce (in small part) the “Azolla event” in which a massive bloom of duckweed in a fresh water Arctic Ocean reversed the greenhouse climate prevalent in the Eocene, reducing atmospheric carbon from more than 6 times the current level.

+ Tim Kruger, University of Oxford
Carbon Dioxide Irrigation: Using CO2 to Make the Desert Bloom

tkTim Kruger is a James Martin Fellow at the Oxford Geoengineering Programme (OGP), an initiative of the Oxford Martin School at the University of Oxford. He coordinates the activities of the OGP, which is seeking to assess the social, technical, environmental and ethical issues associated with all proposed geoengineering techniques. He has investigated in detail one potential geoengineering technique, that of adding alkalinity to the ocean as a way of enhancing its capacity to act as a carbon sink and to counteract the effects of ocean acidification.
Tim is on the Advisory Board of the UK’s Integrated Assessment of Geoengineering Proposals and of the EU’s European Union Transdisciplinary Assessment of Climate Engineering. He was also one of the co-authors of “The Oxford Principles” – a set of draft principles for the conduct of geoengineering research that were endorsed by the UK Government in their response to the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee’s Report on “The Regulation of Geoengineering”.

Carbon Dioxide Irrigation: Using CO2 to Make the Desert Bloom

Abstract: A process that reduces the amount of water that is needed to produce biomass by over 99% compared to conventional agriculture is explained and the results of two series of experiments that explore the process are presented. The crux of the concept is that plants ‘give away’ a scarce commodity, water, in order to obtain an even scarcer commodity, carbon dioxide, which they require for photosynthesis – by giving plants carbon dioxide, the amount of water that is required is substantially reduced. Greenhouse growers already enrich carbon dioxide levels to boost productivity in a process known as ‘carbon dioxide fertilisation’. The experiments demonstrate that such a boosting of carbon dioxide levels reduce water usage, displacing conventional irrigation requirements – we have named this process ‘carbon dioxide irrigation.’

+ Raghubir Gupta, Research Triangle International
Sustainable Biofuels – A Small Step towards Carbon Management

rg
Dr. Raghubir Gupta is the Vice President of the Energy Technology Division at RTI International. Dr. Gupta obtained his B. Tech. degree in Chemical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India. He worked as a process engineer for Engineers India Limited in Delhi before earning his Ph.D. degree (also in Chemical Engineering) from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Dr. Gupta joined RTI in 1990 as a Research Chemical Engineer. During his tenure, he has played a key role in establishing a strong R&D program in the clean energy area at RTI. Dr. Gupta currently leads a group of more than 40 researchers comprising of engineers and chemists. Dr. Gupta’s technical expertise ranges from coal/biomass gasification, synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup and utilization, syngas conversion into fuels and chemicals including Fischer Tropsch chemistry, hydrogen production and storage, carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration, desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels, production of cellulosic biofuels and industrial water reuse. Currently he is overseeing a $180 million syngas cleanup demonstration project funded by DOE to build a semi-commercial syngas cleanup and carbon capture system. Dr. Gupta has presented his research work in a number of national and international conferences, published in a number of reputed journals and holds more than 20 U.S. and foreign patents.

Sustainable Biofuels – A Small Step towards Carbon Management

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defines Advanced Biofuels by a greater than 50% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. DOE is investing significantly on developing, demonstrating, and deploying advanced biofuels technologies to support a robust, domestic bioenergy industry that sustainably utilizes our domestic biomass resources to increase energy security and spur job creation. A number of viable technology pathways have been identified for converting biomass into advanced, hydrocarbon biofuels via biochemical and thermochemical technology options. The key to economic competitiveness of these conversion technologies is to maximize the biofuel products and supplement the revenue with high value co-products, if possible.
By definition, biomass is hydrogen deficient and oxygen rich (~45 wt% oxygen) compared to conventional transportations fuels. Oxygen removal while still maintaining carbon efficiency is paramount for maximizing energy recovery in the biofuel. Techno-economic analysis highlights the importance of overall product yield for economic viability of biofuels process options.
Thermochemical conversion pathways include direct and indirect liquefaction options. Direct liquefaction pathways include biomass fast pyrolysis, catalytic fast pyrolysis, hydropyrolysis, and hydrothermal liquefaction. These direct liquefaction processes yield a hydrocarbon-rich intermediate that requires some level of additional upgrading for advanced biofuel production. The key to these thermochemical conversion pathways is high yield with high carbon retention in the product. The carbon efficiency of these thermochemical conversion pathways varies between 30-50% in the biofuel product. The remaining carbon in the process exists as CO2 in process gas streams or as solid char. There are opportunities to utilize the carbon in the gas and solid streams to increase biofuel yield or produce value-added by-products to improve process economics while further reducing the carbon emissions.
This presentation will provide an overview of the current landscape of the biofuels technologies and discuss the opportunities to utilize carbon dioxide to improve the overall process economics of current and emerging biofuels technologies.

4:05-4:25pm: Closing Remarks: The Closed Carbon Fuel Cycle as another “Moonshoot”
+ Klaus Lackner, Columbia University

kl2010@columbia.edu

klKlaus Lackner is the Ewing Worzel Professor of Geophysics and the Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Lackner’s current research interests include carbon capture and sequestration, air capture, energy systems and scaling properties (including synthetic fuels and wind energy), energy and environmental policy, lifecycle analysis, and zero emission modeling for coal and cement plants. Lackner earned his Ph.D. in theoretical particle physics, summa cum laude, in 1978 from Heidelberg University, was awarded the Clemm-Haas Prize for outstanding Ph.D. thesis, and was named a Fleischmann Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. He was instrumental in forming the Zero Emission Coal Alliance and was a lead author in the IPCC Report on Carbon Capture and Storage. In 1991, he received the Weapons Recognition of Excellence Award. Prof. Lackner joined the faculty at Columbia University in 2001.


Research Coordination Network (RCN) on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Annual Meeting Panel 1 & 2, Tuesday, April 15th, 2014

Introduction (video link)
+ Alissa Park, Columbia University
NSF RCN-SEES: Multidisciplinary Approaches to CCUS

ap2622@columbia.edu

apAh-Hyung (Alissa) Park is the Lenfest Professor in Applied Climate Science of Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering at Columbia University. She is also the Associate Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at the Earth Institute. Prof. Park received her Bachelors and Masters from the University of British Columbia, both in Chemical Engineering and joined Columbia University in the fall of 2007 after completing her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Ohio State University. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) and sustainable energy conversion pathways with emphasis on innovative materials and reaction schemes based on the principles of particle technology and advanced carbonate chemistry. The current research efforts of Park’s group include fundamental studies of the cutting-edge of CCUS by developing novel nano-scale materials for CO2 capture and better carbon storage options based on carbonate chemistry involving earth abundant silicate minerals. Founded on these new materials and reaction schemes, Park’s research group creates innovative fuel synthesis pathways using unconventional energy sources such as biomass and municipal solid wastes while minimizing environmental impacts and specifically by reducing CO2 emission. Park received a number of professional awards and honors including the NSF CAREER Award in 2009 and James Lee Young Investigator Award in 2010. She is the PI of the Research Coordination Network (RCN) on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS).

Panel 1 Regulatory Developments, Costs and Risk Assessment (video link)
Moderator:
+Shelley Welton, Columbia Law School

shelley.welton@law.columbia.edu

swShelley Welton is the Deputy Director of Columbia Law School’s Center for Climate Change Law and the Earth Institute Climate Law Fellow. Her research focuses on the intersections of climate and energy law, including regulatory strategies for promoting energy efficiency, ways to enhance federal and state transmission policy, and legal issues related to state and regional efforts to regulate greenhouse gases. She received her J.D. from New York University School of Law in 2009 and an MPA in environmental science and policy from Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs in 2006. Prior to joining the Center for Climate Change Law, she served as a clerk in the Eastern District of New York and for the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Speakers:
+ Scott Barrett, School of International and Public Affairs: Columbia University
Role of CCUS in International Climate Negotiations

sb3116@columbia.edu

sbScott Barrett is the Lenfest-Earth Institute Professor of Natural Resource Economics at Columbia University. His research focuses on how institutions like norms, customary law, resolutions, and treaties can be used to promote international cooperation on issues like climate change and disease eradication. He is the author of numerous peer-reviewed articles as well as two books, Environment and Statecraft and Why Cooperate?, both published by Oxford University Press. In addition to his academic work, he has advises a number of international organizations on these issues and was previously a lead author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Barrett previously taught at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, DC and at the London Business School. He has also been a visiting scholar at Yale and Princeton. Barrett is a research fellow with the Beijer Institute (Stockholm), CESifo (Munich), and the Kiel Institute of World Economics. He received his PhD in Economics from the London School of Economics.

+ Michael Gerrard, Columbia Law School
Legal Status of Carbon Capture and Sequestration

michael.gerrard@law.columbia.edu

mgMichael B. Gerrard, Andrew Sabin Professor of Professional Practice at Columbia Law School, teaches courses on environmental law, climate change law, and energy law, and is director of the Center for Climate Change Law. He is also Associate Chair of the faculty of Columbia University’s Earth Institute. From 1979 through 2008 he practiced environmental law in New York, most recently as partner in charge of the New York office of Arnold & Porter LLP. Upon joining the Columbia law faculty in 2009, he became Senior Counsel to the firm. His practice involved trying numerous cases and arguing many appeals in federal and state courts and administrative tribunals, handling the environmental aspects of numerous transactions and development projects, and providing regulatory compliance advice to a wide variety of clients in the private and public sectors. He has written or edited eleven books, including Global Climate Change and U.S. Law, the leading work in its field, and the twelve-volume Environmental Law Practice Guide. Since 1986 he has been an environmental law columnist for the New York Law Journal. Gerrard was the 2004-2005 chair of the American Bar Association’s 10,000-member Section of Environment, Energy and Resources. He also chaired the Executive Committee of the New York City Bar Association, and the Environmental Law Section of the New York State Bar Association. He has served on the executive committees of the boards of the Environmental Law Institute and the American College of Environmental Lawyers.

+ Jon Gibbins, University of Edinburg
UK Carbon Capture and Storage developments

jon.gibbins@ed.ac.uk

jgProf. Jon Gibbins, is the director of the United Kingdom Carbon Capture and Storage Research Center. He is also a member of Pilot Scale Advanced Carbon Technology (PACT) executive board on behalf of the University of Edinburgh and manages ACTTROM – PACT Satellite facilities at the University of Edinburgh. He was previously the Principal Investigator of the UK Carbon Capture and Storage Community Network (www.ukccsc.co.uk), supported by RCUK to help link academic CCS research activities in the UK. Jon has also been the Principal Investigator for the UK Carbon and Capture Storage Consortium, the UK lead for CO2 capture in the UK/China NZEC (Near Zero Emissions from Coal) project, and a member of IEA GHG project teams looking at post-combustion capture, oxyfuel, capture plant learning curves and capture ready plants. He is an invited Government expert on CCS, has provided expert review of the IPCC Special Report on CO2 Capture, and has been an invited speaker in many international meetings and symposia on CCS.

+ Raghubir Gupta, Research Triangle International
Risk Issues with CCUS

gupta@rti.org

rg
Dr. Raghubir Gupta is the Vice President of the Energy Technology Division at RTI International. Dr. Gupta obtained his B. Tech. degree in Chemical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India. He worked as a process engineer for Engineers India Limited in Delhi before earning his Ph.D. degree (also in Chemical Engineering) from the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. Dr. Gupta joined RTI in 1990 as a Research Chemical Engineer. During his tenure, he has played a key role in establishing a strong R&D program in the clean energy area at RTI. Dr. Gupta currently leads a group of more than 40 researchers comprising of engineers and chemists. Dr. Gupta’s technical expertise ranges from coal/biomass gasification, synthesis gas (syngas) cleanup and utilization, syngas conversion into fuels and chemicals including Fischer Tropsch chemistry, hydrogen production and storage, carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration, desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels, production of cellulosic biofuels and industrial water reuse. Currently he is overseeing a $180 million syngas cleanup demonstration project funded by DOE to build a semi-commercial syngas cleanup and carbon capture system. Dr. Gupta has presented his research work in a number of national and international conferences, published in a number of reputed journals and holds more than 20 U.S. and foreign patents.

+ Klaus Lackner, Columbia University

kl2010@columbia.edu

klKlaus Lackner is the Ewing Worzel Professor of Geophysics and the Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Lackner’s current research interests include carbon capture and sequestration, air capture, energy systems and scaling properties (including synthetic fuels and wind energy), energy and environmental policy, lifecycle analysis, and zero emission modeling for coal and cement plants. Lackner earned his Ph.D. in theoretical particle physics, summa cum laude, in 1978 from Heidelberg University, was awarded the Clemm-Haas Prize for outstanding Ph.D. thesis, and was named a Fleischmann Fellow at the California Institute of Technology. He was instrumental in forming the Zero Emission Coal Alliance and was a lead author in the IPCC Report on Carbon Capture and Storage. In 1991, he received the Weapons Recognition of Excellence Award. Prof. Lackner joined the faculty at Columbia University in 2001.

Panel 2 Global Large-Scale Projects on CCUS and their Outlooks (video link)
Moderator:
+ Camille Petit, Imperial College London
Overview of large-scale CO2 capture projects in Europe, Asia and Africa

camille.petit@imperial.ac.uk

cpDr. Camille Petit has recently taken a post as a lecturer in Chemical Engineering at Imperial College, London. Prior she was a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Earth and Environmental Engineering Department at the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy Columbia University from 2011-2013. She holds a PhD in Chemistry from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, NY (2007-2011) and an MSc in Chemistry (2005-2007) and a BSc in Physics and Chemistry from Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Montpellier. Her research focuses on the design, characterization and testing of novel multi-functional materials for environmental sustainability, with applications in CCUS and water purification. Prof. Petit has published extensively in the area of carbon capture using liquid-like nanoparticle organic hydrid materials (NOHMs).

Speakers:
+ Roger Aines, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Lessons from Large Scale CO2 injection

aines@llnl.gov

raDr. Roger Aines develops climate and energy technologies, working for 30 years in the US national laboratory system. He has delivered and endured countless scientific presentations – recognizing the value of effective communication. Since 1984, Roger’s work has spanned nuclear waste disposal, environmental remediation, applying stochastic methods to inversion and data fusion, managing carbon emissions and sequestration monitoring and verification methods. Roger received research funding from the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, the Environmental Protection Agency, a number of corporations and private foundations to address future climate challenges. He received one of the early round of ARPA-E grants to study carbon dioxide capture. Roger takes an integrated view of the energy, climate, and environmental aspects of carbon-based fuel production and use. His current focus is on efficient ways to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and safer methods for producing environmentally clean fuel. He holds 12 patents and has authored more than 100 publications. Roger holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Chemistry from Carleton College, and Doctor of Philosophy in geochemistry from the California Institute of Technology.

+ Patrick Brady, Sandia National Laboratories

pvbrady@sandia.gov

pbDr. Patrick Brady is a Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories and has authored or co-authored several dozen peer-reviewed journal articles, 11 patents, in the fields of water treatment, contaminant chemistry, enhanced oil recovery, nuclear waste disposal, and climate change. He’s been at Sandia since 1993 while serving as the adjunct Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico since 1998. Before Sandia he was an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at SMU in Dallas, Texas. Brady has written, edited, or co-edited books on Soil Radiochemistry, Desalination and Water Treatment, Mineral Surface Chemistry, and Natural Attenuation of Groundwater Contaminants. He is on the Research Advisory Committee of the WateReuse Foundation, the Editorial Board of Chemical Geology, and the Science Advisory Board of the Association for the Environmental Health of Soils.

+ Jeff Fitts, Princeton University
The current state of CO2 utilization

fitts@Princeton.edu

jfDr. Jeff Fitts is a Research Scientist, in the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Princeton University. His research combines numerical and experimental methods to study chemical reactions at interfaces that drive the evolution of environmental systems. The aim is to advance the geochemical science and engineering needed to develop increasingly robust quantitative projections of the human health, environmental and climatic costs of energy technologies. Synchrotron-based x-ray probes are often applied to study dissolution, precipitation and contaminant speciation at mineral-water interfaces. Current projects aim to assess contaminant mobility during shale gas extraction, permeability evolution of leakage pathways through caprocks of geologic CO2 storage reservoirs, stability of encapsulated nuclear waste, and activity of catalysts for wastewater treatment.

+ John Grace, University of British Columbia
Implementation of Large-Scale Carbon Capture units – a Canadian Perspective

jgrace@chbe.ubc.ca

jgrJohn Grace is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Clean Energy at the University of British Columbia (UBC). He is the director of the fluidization research center at UBC. Dr. Grace’s primary research interests are concerned with fluidized bed reactors and related multi-phase systems. Fluidized beds are used for a wide variety of chemical and physical purposes, for example in catalytic, gas-solid and three-phase reactors, drying, coating and thermal treatment. Some of the topics studied in the recent past include transient forces on immersed tubes, heat transfer in circulating fluidized beds, hydrodynamics and mixing in high velocity beds, effects of particle size distribution, reactor modelling, scale-up issues, attrition, electrostatics, non-uniformity of flow through parallel channels, computational fluid dynamics, comparison of alternative techniques for voidage and velocity measurements, and dispersion and inversion phenomena in liquid-fluidized beds. Applications studied include fluidized bed combustion and gasification of biomass and coal, a novel process for steam reforming of natural gas to make pure hydrogen, and greenhouse gas capture. Dr. Grace holds an honorary D.Sc from University of Western Ontario (2003), a Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Cambridge University (1968) and a B.E.Sc., University of Western Ontario (1965).

+ Peter Kelemen, Columbia University
Carbonation of mantle peridotite: National systems, global carbon cycle, engineered capture & storage

peterk@ldeo.columbia.edu

pkPeter Kelemen is Arthur D. Storke Professor of Geochemistry at Columbia University’s Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory where he moved from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 2004. In addition to his academic work, he was a mineral exploration consultant from 1980 to 1991, evaluating deposits of copper, gold, and platinum in the steeper parts of Canada, Alaska and Greenland. Dr. Keleman’s research interests include CO2 capture and storage via in situ mineral carbonation in peridotite and basalt; melting and reactive melt transport in the Earth’s mantle and lower crust; igneous processes in forming the Earth’s crust; ductile deformation and evolution of the lower crust; subduction zone geotherms and the mechanisms for intermediate depth earthquakes. Recently, he has added CO2 capture and storage via in situ mineral carbonation to his research program. He has a B.A. in earth sciences from Dartmouth and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.


RCN-CCUS Annual Meeting, Panel 3
Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Introduction

Panel 3 Current Status and Challenges in CO2 Capture and Conversion (video link)
Moderator:
+ Alissa Park, Columbia University
Toward Sustainable Energy: Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage

ap2622@columbia.edu

apAh-Hyung (Alissa) Park is the Lenfest Professor in Applied Climate Science of Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering at Columbia University. She is also the Associate Director of the Lenfest Center for Sustainable Energy at the Earth Institute. Prof. Park received her Bachelors and Masters from the University of British Columbia, both in Chemical Engineering and joined Columbia University in the fall of 2007 after completing her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Ohio State University. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) and sustainable energy conversion pathways with emphasis on innovative materials and reaction schemes based on the principles of particle technology and advanced carbonate chemistry. The current research efforts of Park’s group include fundamental studies of the cutting-edge of CCUS by developing novel nano-scale materials for CO2 capture and better carbon storage options based on carbonate chemistry involving earth abundant silicate minerals. Founded on these new materials and reaction schemes, Park’s research group creates innovative fuel synthesis pathways using unconventional energy sources such as biomass and municipal solid wastes while minimizing environmental impacts and specifically by reducing CO2 emission. Park received a number of professional awards and honors including the NSF CAREER Award in 2009 and James Lee Young Investigator Award in 2010. She is the PI of the Research Coordination Network (RCN) on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS).

Speakers:
+ Andrew Bocarsly, Princeton University
CO2 Conversion to Fuels

bocarsly@princeton.edu

abAndrew Bocarsly received his Bachelor of Science degree jointly in chemistry and physics from UCLA in 1976, and his Ph.D. in chemistry from M.I.T. in 1980. He has been a member of the Princeton University, Chemistry Department faculty for thirty years. Professor Bocarsly has published over 175 papers in peer reviewed journals and co-authored six patents. Research in his laboratory is focused on the materials chemistry associated with elevated temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including composite membranes for elevated temperature cells and electrocatalysts for direct alcohol fuel cells; visible light photoelectrochemistry for the conversion of carbon dioxide to alcohols; cyanogel sol-gel processing routes to refractory materials, metal alloys and nanostructures; and molecule-based multielectron photoinduced charge transfer processes. Professor Bocarsly also serves as a consultant and contractor to various fuel cell and alternate energy companies. He is a founder and President of the Science Advisory Board for Liquid Light Inc., a company formed to commercialize the formation of organic commodity chemicals from carbon dioxide using alternate energy sources. Professor Bocarsly has received an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the Sigma Xi (Princeton Section) Science Educator Award, the American Chemical Society-Exxon Solid State Chemistry award, and serves as the electrochemistry editor for Methods in Materials Research. Presently, he is serving as a volume editor for Structure and Bonding in the area of fuel cells and batteries.

+ L.S. Fan, Ohio State University
Chemical Looping Technology

fan.1@osu.edu

lfLiang-Shih Fan is a Distinguished University C J Easton Professor of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at the Ohio State University. His research group is engaged in fundamental and applied research in the areas including fluidization and multiphase flow, particulate reaction engineering, and particle technology. He holds several patents, including the invention of the leading clean-coal technology in the United States: chemical looping processes for electricity, hydrogen, fuel and chemical production — which have been licensed and are currently being demonstrated at a pilot scale for commercial applications. He has also invented the first and only Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography for 3-dimensional real-time imaging of multiphase flows and reactor systems – commercialized by a spinoff company (Tech4Imaging) and used worldwide in academic research and industrial practice. He holds a B.S., National Taiwan University, 1970, an M.S. (1973) and Ph.D (1975) from West Virginia University, as well as an M.S. (1978) in Statistics from Kansas State University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

+ Christopher Jones, Georgia Institute of Technology
Point Source Capture vs. “Air Capture”

cjones@chbe.gatech.edu

cjProfessor Chris Jones is currently the Associate Vice President for Research at Georgia Institute of Technology. He works in synthetic molecular and materials chemistry to create new molecules and materials for applications in catalysis and adsorption. Three key focus areas include (i) supported molecular catalysis in organic synthesis, (ii) heterogeneous catalysis and (iii) CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization. In 2010, he was selected as the founding Editor-in-Chief of ACS Catalysis, a new multi-disciplinary catalysis journal published by the American Chemical Society. Dr. Jones has been PI or co-PI on over $31M in sponsored research in the last thirteen years, and as of January 2014, has published over 150 papers that have been cited >7000 times. He has an H-Index of 43 (ISI). Chris holds a B.S.E. Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 1995; M.S. Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1997, and a Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1999. Jones joined the Georgia Tech faculty in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2000.

+ Mogens Mogensen, Technical University of Denmark
Overview of CO2 conversion R&D in Europe

momo@dtu.dk

mmMogens Bjerg Mogensn is Research Professor at Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark (DTU). He holds a PhD in Stress Corrosion Cracking of Mild Steel from the Institute of Metallurgy, DTU, 1976. His research and publication activities are mainly in energy research, with over 40 years of electrochemistry and chemistry for energy conversion, reversible electrolyser cells / fuel cells since 1988. His early work was in the areas of batteries, nuclear energy and corrosion. He has been the project manager of several large and numerous smaller scientific projects in close cooperation with industry. Publication activity: from Web of Science: > 225 papers cited > 7250 times, average citations 32; h-index 45. In total > 350 scientific publications in journals, books, proceedings, reports, hereof 20 patents/applications, 20 special reports, 16 popular articles; editor or co-editor of 9 books.

+ Berend Smit, University of California – Berkeley
Computational Carbon Capture

Berend-Smit@Berkeley.edu

bsBerend Smit received in 1990 cum laude PhD in Chemistry from Utrecht University (the Netherlands). He was a (senior) Research Physicists at Shell Research from 1988-1997, Professor of Computational Chemistry at the University of Amsterdam (the Netherlands) 1997-2007. In 2004, Berend Smit was elected the Director of the European Center of Atomic and Molecular Computations (CECAM) Lyon France. Since 2007 he is Professor of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry at U.C. Berkeley and Faculty Chemist at Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Since 2009 he is the director of the Energy Frontier Research Center for gas separations relevant for clear air technologies. Berend Smit’s research focuses on the application and development of novel molecular simulation techniques. Together with DaanFrenkel he wrote the textbook Understanding Molecular Simulations. He also co-authored a book titled “Introduction to Carbon Capture and Sequestration.”

Poster Session
To see posters presented at conference and their abstracts, click here